Hudson Taylor and Missions to China: Christian History Timeline

Hudson Taylor

1807 
Englishman Robert Morrison, first Protestant missionary to China at Canton

1830 
Elijah Coleman Bridgman, first American missionary to China, arrives at Canton

1832 
May 21: Hudson Taylor born

1840’s 
Karl Gützlaff works in China

1843–1860 
American and British Methodists, Presbyterians, Baptists, and Episcopalians send missionaries to China treaty ports

1850 
Taylor declares China hopes

1853 
September: Taylor departs for China

1854 
March: Taylor lands at Shanghai; December: first inland journey

1857 
Taylor proposes to Maria Dyer; resigns from Chinese Evangelization Society; Ningpo mission started

1858 
Taylor and Maria marry

1861 
An exhausted Taylor and his family depart for rest in England

1862 
Taylor qualifies as midwife

1865 
Taylor resolves to lead China Inland Mission (cim); writes China: Its Spiritual Need and Claims

1866 
Lammermuir sails with Taylor, his family, and 16 cim missionaries

1868 
Lewis Nicol dismissed from CIM; anti-foreign riot in Yangchow injures several missionaries

1869 
House of Lords debates value of missions to China

1870 
Maria Taylor dies

1871 
Taylor marries Jennie Faulding

1875 
Taylor appeals for 18 pioneers to go to nine interior provinces; April: recovers from paralysis; July: China’s Millions Vol. 1, No. 1, published

1876–1880 
18 CIM missionaries penetrate nine interior provinces

1885 
“Cambridge Seven” depart for China

1886 
Taylor appeals for 100 new missionaries

1887 
CIM committees in London and China clash over control of the mission; 100 new missionaries accepted

1900 
Boxer Rebellion—58 cim missionaries and 21 children among those murdered; Taylor in Switzerland recuperating from illness

1903 
D. E. Hoste appointed general director of cim upon Taylor’s retirement

1904 
Jennie Faulding dies

1905 
Hudson Taylor dies; abolition of old examination system opens way for mission schools

1910 
World Missionary Conference, Edinburgh

1926–27 
Nearly all 8,000 Protestant missionaries flee during chaos of Northern Expedition

1934 
CIM missionaries John and Betty Stam executed

1941–1946 
Most missionaries interred or evacuated but return to China after WWII

1951–52 
Wholesale evacuation of missionaries; last of CIM leaves July 20, 1953

Other China Events

1839–42 
First Opium War ends with Treaty of Nanking: five treaty ports open to foreigners; Hong Kong ceded to British

1851–1864 
Taiping Rebellion

1858–1860 
Tientsin and Peking treaties end Opium Wars: more rights granted to foreigners, including right to travel anywhere inland

1877–78 
Worst of the great Shantung-Shansi famine

1883–85 
War with France over Annam (Vietnam)

1894–95 
Sino-Japanese War: China loses Taiwan to Japan and Korea to independence

1897–98 
Various provinces ceded to Britain, France, Germany, and Russia

1898 
Failure of radical reform

1900 
Boxer Rebellion

1911–1912 
Revolution; Republic of China established; Kuomintang Party (KMT) inaugurated

1919 
May 4th Student Movement

1921 
Chinese Communist Party (CCP) founded

1926–1927 
Chiang Kai-shek launches Northern Expedition to unite China under KMT, and purges CCP from its ranks

1934 
Long March: CCP forces under Mao Tse-tung retreat from KMT

1937 
Open war with Japan begins; KMT and CCP fight Japan together

1946 
KMT and CCP resume civil war

1949 
October: People’s Democratic Republic of China declared

By the Editors

[Christian History originally published this article in Christian History Issue #52 in 1996]

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